(un)Wordless Wednesday

I really liked my post yesterday, except for one thing.  I don’t think I gave you enough good exterior images about curb appeal and front doors.  So, hopefully I can redeem myself today!  I like doors, and I love architecture as much as interior design, so I had a lot of fun looking for what you see below.  (Of course, I also found some images of front doors from the inside of the house, and couldn’t help but include them here too!)  Enjoy!

(all images from Pinterest)

Which house is your favorite?  Which do you think looks the most welcoming?

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Timeless Trait Tuesday – Inviting and Welcoming

What makes you want to enter a house?  What makes you want to stay?

What makes a home invite you in and welcome you with open arms?

I think we can all agree that there are two categories: the exterior of a house invites you in, and the interior of a house welcomes you to stay.  Through my reading and my studies, I’ve found several characteristics that I think say “come on in and stay awhile!”

Exterior Characteristics

Sheltering Roof – symbol of home; offers protection and safety

Visible Entry – designated path to experiencing the inside of the home

Curb Appeal – appetizer to the interior

Interior Characteristics

Warmth

Texture

Natural Light

Comfort

Order

Personality

Rare for me, this post is long on images and shorter on words 🙂

A home is meant to be inhabited, lived in, cared for and enjoyed.  If it is not inviting, these things cannot take place.  After all, can something be timeless if no one wants to live in it or derive any joy from it?

Must-Read Monday – “Welcoming Home” by Michaela Mahady

As you all can tell by now, I’m addicted to books.  And, unfortunately for my habit, I discovered many months ago that One Kings Lane has coffee table books for sale every couple weeks, I’ve been in big trouble!  I want to share with you one I just received last week, and is so perfect for the theme of this blog.

“Welcoming Home” is written by Minnesota architect Michaela Mahady.  Her goal in presenting this publication was to present that main characteristics of a house that make it an inviting home.  Personally, I think the summary in the book jacket does the best job of stating this:

“…architecture Michaela Mahady explores how humans experience built places in order to identify those characteristics that make us feel welcome, protected, comforted and happy.  She examines such elements as welcoming entryways, sheltering roofs, handcrafted details that convey personality and tradition, and materials and colors that create comfort and warmth.”

Personally, I think she does a great job at doing this.  While her examples are predominantly Craftsman-style homes, there are beautiful photographs of all the concepts she discusses.  She has designed the book to look at a house from the outside in, working from a holistic perspective to focusing on details.  She points out our timeless trait “sense of place” in a great way, discussing physical, emotional and physiological ties with the land and community, and offers some great anecdotal examples.  She gives advice on what questions to ask yourself during a building process to ensure that the home reflects your lifestyle and your neighborhood.

(all images from Google Preview)

What makes you feel welcome in a home?
What have you done in your home to make others feel welcome?

Come back tomorrow to discuss more on this timeless trait!

(un)Wordless Wednesday

It’s hopeless to call this post wordless, but I’ll keep it as brief as possible!  Yesterday’s post about “sense of place” got me thinking about the trip my family took to Ireland several years ago.  (Someday I’ll get my old computer’s hard drive hooked up to my new one and find those pictures for you!)

If you ever have the opportunity to travel the Irish countryside, you will see how unchanged it has remained.  (In fact, there are many places where ridges from the old potato farms are still visible on the green, rolling hills.)  Homes traditionally had large, sloping, thatched roofs.  They would develop into a form with a chimney at each end of the home, anchoring a more traditional peaked roof, beginning as thatch but turning into more contemporary roofing materials.  The twin-chimney form is still commonly used in new construction.

Enjoy the pretties below!

Come back tomorrow for more ramblings about sense of place!